History

SAGA2MÍ05(ms)- World history and and Icelandic history from the 18th century

The subject of the course is world history and Icelandic history from the end of the 18th century to contemporary times. Attempt made to analyse the basic concepts of the pioneers of the enlightenment, especially concerning politics and its influence, such as the American revolution, the French revolution and nationalist movements in Europe. Emphasis is placed on the premise of the industrial revolution, its spread and influence on society and the sitation of individual states and parts of the world, such as in Iceland. Covered are economic influences of technology and energy use on nature and human environment. Human rights and fight for freedom have a large place in both the 19th and the 20th century and will the subject the fight for freedom and civic rights such as the right to vote in the 19th and the 20th be particularly looked at. At the beginning of the 20th century an air of optimism floated over Europe, covered will be the great social changes that took place and how this optimism for the future changed when the Great War broke out on July 28 1914. World history changes course when fascist movements gain power in Russia, Italy and Germany in the early part of the 20th century. The rise of Nazis, fascists and communists will be studied and what influences these movements had in the years 1917-1990. Studied will be the cause, workings and consequences of WWII; especially looked at the influence it had in Iceland. The Holocaust will be dealt with especially. Studied will be the period between 1947-1991 which was characterised by economic, scientific, artistic and military competition between the USA and USSR and their allies. Also studied are the liberation of colonies in the years following WWII and its premise. Emphasis will be placed on observing Icelandic history in relation to world history and what influence major events in other countries and ideologies had here in Iceland. The teacher will deal with individual important parts of the subject material in the form of lectures, but students do other and more specific issues in individual and group assignments. The material categories are as follows: The Enlightement An attempt made to analyse the basic concepts of the pioneers of the enlightenment, especially concerning politics and its influence, such as the American revolution, the French revolution and nationalist movements in Europe. The Industrial Revolution. Emphasis is placed on the premise of the industrial revolution, its spread and influence on society and the sitation of individual states and parts of the world, such as in Iceland. Covered are economic influences of technology and energy use on nature and human environment. Human rights and fight for freedom. Here the subject is the  fight for freedom and civic rights such as the right to vote in the 19th and 20th century. The Millenium. At the beginning of the 20th century an air of optimism floated over Europe, covered will be the great social changes that took place and how this optimism for the future changed when the Great War broke out on July 28 1914. Also studied is the back stage of colonialism. Totalitarianism and regimes. World history changes course when fascist movements gain power in Russia, Italy and Germany in the early part of the 20th century. The rise of Nazis, fascists and communists will be studied and what influences these movements had in the years 1917-1990. WWII Studied will be the cause, workings and consequences of WWII. Especially looked at is the influence it had in Iceland. The Holocaust will be dealt with especially. The Cold War. Studied will be the period between 1947-1991 which was characterised by economic, scientific, artistic and military competition between the USA and USSR and their allies.

SAGA2FE05(ms) - Classical antiquity and the Renaissance

The emphasis in this course is on the cultural heritage that the world's first cultural states, such as Ancient Greece and Rome, placed as the basis for western civilisation. In this course students are introduced to, analyse and evaluate the cultural artifacts of the cultural heritage of Ancient Greece and Rome, especially during the Renaissance. Students become familiar with chosen features in the history of ancient civilisations and the renaissance in its dynamic evolution all the way to modern times. Students should see and understand how a culture grows given certain societal conditions and how culture becomes a moving force in societal change. At the end of the course, students should be able to recognise and identify the characteristics of this cultural heritage in the past and the present. Thus the students should become culturally literate on our contemporary times, understand Europe's man-made landscape, i.e. art work and buildings and be able to understand and appreciate literature and literary references to the ancient cultural heritage. Students should also have been introduced to and contemplated the ideas of the major philosophers and scholars of the eras, those that have had the most effect on the ideological system of western modern era and people's attitude to beauty, state power, justice, conformity and prosperity, to take a few examples.

Prerequisite: SAGA2MÍ05(ms).

SAGA3SA05(ms) - Contemporary history. 20th century 1950-2015

The subject material is the history of the 20th century from 1950 to the present day with special emphasis on the Cold War, its cause and effect. The plan is to deepen and sharpen the students' understanding on the history of this period and also to make available to them a systematic training in independent working methods.  World history will be at the forefront, but a special emphasis will also be placed on revealing how world events during the century affected Iceland and what effect they had on the nation's history. Emphsis is placed on students becoming familiar with various types of source material and learn to evalute them with critical thinking.

Prerequisite: SAGA2MÍ05(ms)

SAGA3ST05(ms) - Between the Wars. 20th century 1900-1945

The subject material of the course is the early part of the 20th century. The plan is to deepen and sharpen the students' understanding on the history of this period and also to make available to them a systematic training in independent working methods.  World history will be at the forefront, but a special emphasis will also be placed on revealing how world events during the century affected Iceland. The plan is to watch historical films and documentaries in relation to the subject material and do various assignments The aim is to go on field trips and have guest lecturers. Categories of materail are: Colonialism. Here colonialism in Africa, Asia and Latin America are dealt with. The colonialism of the major powers in Europe very much characterised the last decades of the 19th century and the years before WWI. WWI. Discussed will be the sitation in world affairs at the beginning of WWI, the workings and nature of the war and the peace making in its aftermath. The Russian Revolution is also studied. Between the wars. Studied will be how politics changed dramatically after WWI. The fertile art and culture of these decades will be especially studied. Also studied will be the Great Depression, its cause and effect. WWII. Discussed events leading up to and the source of WWII, the workings of the war on various fronts, resistance movements agains German occupation and naval warfare. The Holocaust is especially studied.

Prerequisite: SAGA2MÍ05(ms)

SAGA3MM05(ms) - History in Writing and on Film

The subject material of historians is to research and interpret events in the past and in this way seek explanations for the evolution that has carried humanity to its present location. For this reason historians use many different routes, though most often by researching the original source, such as written source material and ancient artifacts. Documentaries clearly count as historical sources, often as a witness source of the events they deal with, but traditional films do not, strictly speaking, fall within the framework of dealing with events and recreate them according the strictest rules of history. The subject material in this course are first and foremost films in this traditional sense and the idea is to look at how past events are revealed to us in them and what assumptions we can infer regarding their historic value. Films have the advantage, if they are carefully made, that they can through their visual value encapsulate the spirit of the periods and thus place historic facts into a visual context so the viewer can to some degree sense the historic period in a much closer way than otherwise. It is a well-known fact that films shape in a large way our ideas of history and thus it is valuable to look closely at their value as source material. Documentaries will also be studied. Documentaries are the type of films where real events or affairs are dealt with. The idea is to increase and deepen students' historic knowledge, increase their ability to analyse the different historic source value of films and documentaries. To study films and documentaries with a critical mindset and analyse a possible ideology they promote directly or indirectly. In this course specific themes are used, films related to them shown for each of them, they placed in historic context and an attempt made to evaluate their value as source material. Examples of themes in History in writing and on film can be, e.g. biographies - Life and work of, for example, politicians, dictators; dream of a better life - Black civil rights struggle in USA and South Africa. The right to vote, nations' liberation struggle, Japanese history and culture, the Middle-Ages, etc.

Prerequisite: SAGA2MÍ05(ms)

Síðast uppfært: 21.02.2019